July 24, 2014
americansongwriter:

Kelley Mickwee: You Used To Live Here
Kelley MickweeYou Used to Live Here(CEN/Red)3.5 out of 5 stars

Read the rest here:

americansongwriter:

Kelley Mickwee: You Used To Live Here

Kelley Mickwee
You Used to Live Here
(CEN/Red)
3.5 out of 5 stars

Read the rest here:

July 24, 2014
americansongwriter:

Kelley Mickwee: You Used to Live Here
Kelley MickweeYou Used to Live Here(CEN/Red)3.5 out of 5 stars
The name may be unfamiliar to most, but just because this is Kelley Mickwee’s solo debut doesn’t mean she isn’t a veteran performer with thousands of miles and hundreds of shows under her belt. First as half of folk twosome Jed & Kelley, then a five year stint with the terrific Trishas, an all female Americana quartet, Mickwee has put in enough hours inside and out of studios to make her first album sound like the work of a rugged journeyman performer rather than a hesitant newbie. Starting with the opening slow, sensual chords of “River Girl,” any astute listener can tell this is the product of Memphis. From the soulful tempos that take their time to the space between the notes that drips with muggy Southern heat, this singer/songwriter has a vision to capture the often elusive Muscle Shoals vibe.
Click here to read more

americansongwriter:

Kelley Mickwee: You Used to Live Here

Kelley Mickwee
You Used to Live Here
(CEN/Red)
3.5 out of 5 stars

The name may be unfamiliar to most, but just because this is Kelley Mickwee’s solo debut doesn’t mean she isn’t a veteran performer with thousands of miles and hundreds of shows under her belt. First as half of folk twosome Jed & Kelley, then a five year stint with the terrific Trishas, an all female Americana quartet, Mickwee has put in enough hours inside and out of studios to make her first album sound like the work of a rugged journeyman performer rather than a hesitant newbie. Starting with the opening slow, sensual chords of “River Girl,” any astute listener can tell this is the product of Memphis. From the soulful tempos that take their time to the space between the notes that drips with muggy Southern heat, this singer/songwriter has a vision to capture the often elusive Muscle Shoals vibe.

Click here to read more

July 17, 2014
breakingnews:

Broadway actress Elaine Stritch dies at 89
The New York Times: Elaine Stritch, the Broadway actress and singer known for her stage and TV work and originating Stephen Sondheim’s hit song “The Ladies Who Lunch,” died on Thursday at her home in Birmingham, Mich. She was 89.
Photo: Getty Images

breakingnews:

Broadway actress Elaine Stritch dies at 89

The New York Times: Elaine Stritch, the Broadway actress and singer known for her stage and TV work and originating Stephen Sondheim’s hit song “The Ladies Who Lunch,” died on Thursday at her home in Birmingham, Mich. She was 89.

Photo: Getty Images

(via vintage-visuals)

July 15, 2014
My good friend Chuck may need some help with this…

My good friend Chuck may need some help with this…

July 6, 2014
septagonstudios:

Fil Gouvea ON TUMBLR
In The Dark

septagonstudios:

Fil Gouvea ON TUMBLR

In The Dark

July 5, 2014
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Man Who Brought Down KAL 007
On September 1, 1983 at approximately 6:00 p.m. local time, a Soviet MiG jet launched two air-to-air missiles at Korean Air Lines Flight 007 (KAL 007). They dentoated 50 meters behind the Boeing 747 destroying the plane’s hydraulic systems and damaging the tail. Twenty-eight minutes later the passenger jet crashed on Moneron Island in Japan killing all 269 people aboard*.
The Soviets claimed that the jet, which was on the second leg of a flight from New York to Seoul, was actually a spy plane having crossed over into Soviet territory twice before being shot down. In fact, due to a tragic pilot error, the auto-pilot was simply set incorrectly and the plane crossed into the territory without the crew’s knowledge.
The attack on KAL 007 created an international uproar, and while the Soviet Union insisted that the plane was there to spy, President Ronald Reagan referred to the attack as a “crime against humanity.” To make matters worse, the Soviets hindered U.S. search-and-rescue efforts. It wasn’t until after the fall of Communism in 1991 that full records were made available and it was determined that KAL 007 was known to be a passenger plane and was, most likely, in international airspace when missiles were launched.
The order to destroy KAL 007 was given by General Anatoly Kornukov, who was the senior officer on Sakahlin Island. General Kornukov was himself ordered to bring down the aircraft once it was determined that it was not a civilian aircraft. Gen. Kornukov replied, “What civilian? [It] has flown over Kamchatka! It [came] from the ocean without identification. I am giving the order to attack if it crosses the State border.” The pilot who fired the missiles that brought down KAL 007 later stated that he was never asked if the plane was a civilian aircraft, and even though he knew it was a Boeing 747 he never reported it.
General Kornukov was not reprimanded for his actions and it did no harm to his career. In fact, fifteen years after the tragedy General Kornukov was named the head of the Russian Air Force by then-president Boris Yeltsin. The U.S. government and survivor families were upset by the decision but General Kornukov remained in his post until he reached retirement age in 2002.
Anatoly Kornukov, who said “I will always be convinced that I gave the right order” when asked about the incident years later, died on July 1, 2014 at the age of 72. 
Sources: NY Times and Wikipedia
(Image of the September 12, 1983 cover of Time is courtesy of Smithsonian Magazine and copyright of Time, Inc. The cover was originally painted by Thomas Paone.)
* Of the 269 killed the countries with by far the largest casualties were South Korea with 105 passengers and crew dead and the United States with 62 killed, including Georgia Rep. Larry McDonald. Twenty-two children under the age of 12 were also on Flight 007.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Man Who Brought Down KAL 007

On September 1, 1983 at approximately 6:00 p.m. local time, a Soviet MiG jet launched two air-to-air missiles at Korean Air Lines Flight 007 (KAL 007). They dentoated 50 meters behind the Boeing 747 destroying the plane’s hydraulic systems and damaging the tail. Twenty-eight minutes later the passenger jet crashed on Moneron Island in Japan killing all 269 people aboard*.

The Soviets claimed that the jet, which was on the second leg of a flight from New York to Seoul, was actually a spy plane having crossed over into Soviet territory twice before being shot down. In fact, due to a tragic pilot error, the auto-pilot was simply set incorrectly and the plane crossed into the territory without the crew’s knowledge.

The attack on KAL 007 created an international uproar, and while the Soviet Union insisted that the plane was there to spy, President Ronald Reagan referred to the attack as a “crime against humanity.” To make matters worse, the Soviets hindered U.S. search-and-rescue efforts. It wasn’t until after the fall of Communism in 1991 that full records were made available and it was determined that KAL 007 was known to be a passenger plane and was, most likely, in international airspace when missiles were launched.

The order to destroy KAL 007 was given by General Anatoly Kornukov, who was the senior officer on Sakahlin Island. General Kornukov was himself ordered to bring down the aircraft once it was determined that it was not a civilian aircraft. Gen. Kornukov replied, “What civilian? [It] has flown over Kamchatka! It [came] from the ocean without identification. I am giving the order to attack if it crosses the State border.” The pilot who fired the missiles that brought down KAL 007 later stated that he was never asked if the plane was a civilian aircraft, and even though he knew it was a Boeing 747 he never reported it.

General Kornukov was not reprimanded for his actions and it did no harm to his career. In fact, fifteen years after the tragedy General Kornukov was named the head of the Russian Air Force by then-president Boris Yeltsin. The U.S. government and survivor families were upset by the decision but General Kornukov remained in his post until he reached retirement age in 2002.

Anatoly Kornukov, who said “I will always be convinced that I gave the right order” when asked about the incident years later, died on July 1, 2014 at the age of 72. 

Sources: NY Times and Wikipedia

(Image of the September 12, 1983 cover of Time is courtesy of Smithsonian Magazine and copyright of Time, Inc. The cover was originally painted by Thomas Paone.)

* Of the 269 killed the countries with by far the largest casualties were South Korea with 105 passengers and crew dead and the United States with 62 killed, including Georgia Rep. Larry McDonald. Twenty-two children under the age of 12 were also on Flight 007.

July 4, 2014
ourpresidents:


“Liberty is a living flame to be fed, not dead ashes to be revered, even in a Bicentennial year.”
-Gerald R. Ford

President Ford stands at attention while Marines present the flag prior to delivering his remarks on American Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 4, 1976.
-from the Gerald R. Ford Library

ourpresidents:

“Liberty is a living flame to be fed, not dead ashes to be revered, even in a Bicentennial year.”

-Gerald R. Ford

President Ford stands at attention while Marines present the flag prior to delivering his remarks on American Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 4, 1976.

-from the Gerald R. Ford Library

(via retrocampaigns)

June 30, 2014
Check out Tony Auth and all the comics on Yahoo.

Check out Tony Auth and all the comics on Yahoo.

June 30, 2014
Song by Peter Frampton: “Norman Wisdom”

Song by Peter Frampton: “Norman Wisdom”

June 29, 2014
thecivilwarparlor:

Widow Of Civil War General Philip Sheridan
The wife of Lieutenant General Philip Sheridan and the daughter of Brigadier General Daniel H. Rucker (also buried at Arlington). She was born in 1856 at Fort Union, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) and married Sheridan in Chicago on June 3, 1875. She is buried in Section 2 with her husband. 
Chicago Daily News, Inc., photographer. CREATED/PUBLISHED [1924 July 16?]
SUMMARY  Half-length portrait of Mrs. Philip Sheridan, widow of Civil War General Philip Sheridan, smiling and sitting in an upholstered chair with a fan in her lap in a room in Chicago, Illinois.
OBITUARY
Mrs. Philip H. Sheridan, 83, widow of the Union Army’s Cavalry leader, died yesterday afternoon at her home, 2211 Massachusetts Avenue N. W., Washington, D. C., after a long illness. The home is a short distance from Sheridan circle and the equestrian statue of her husband. Death came nearly half a century after the death of her famous husband.
Last of the widows of top-flight Union Army leaders, Mrs. Sheridan was a noted beauty and popular in Washington society.
All her life, Mrs. Sheridan had lived in Army circles. She was the daughter of General D. H. Rucker, who was Quartermaster General of the Army. About 24 years younger than General Sheridan, who was born in 1831, Mrs. Sheridan spent most of her girlhood in Washington and at Army posts. She was born at Fort Union, New Mexico.
While a bridesmaid at a wedding in Chicago, in 1874, Irene Rucker met General Sheridan, who made his headquarters there. For the next few months he courted her steadily, and contemporaries still recall the hero of the Civil War and “pretty Miss Rucker’ riding down Wabash avenue in an open carriage. They were married the following year.
NOTESThis photo negative taken by a Chicago Daily News photographer. Cite as: DN-0077384, Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago History Museum. http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/ireneruc.htm

thecivilwarparlor:

Widow Of Civil War General Philip Sheridan

The wife of Lieutenant General Philip Sheridan and the daughter of Brigadier General Daniel H. Rucker (also buried at Arlington). She was born in 1856 at Fort Union, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) and married Sheridan in Chicago on June 3, 1875. She is buried in Section 2 with her husband.

Chicago Daily News, Inc., photographer. CREATED/PUBLISHED
[1924 July 16?]

SUMMARY
Half-length portrait of Mrs. Philip Sheridan, widow of Civil War General Philip Sheridan, smiling and sitting in an upholstered chair with a fan in her lap in a room in Chicago, Illinois.

OBITUARY

Mrs. Philip H. Sheridan, 83, widow of the Union Army’s Cavalry leader, died yesterday afternoon at her home, 2211 Massachusetts Avenue N. W., Washington, D. C., after a long illness. The home is a short distance from Sheridan circle and the equestrian statue of her husband. Death came nearly half a century after the death of her famous husband.

Last of the widows of top-flight Union Army leaders, Mrs. Sheridan was a noted beauty and popular in Washington society.

All her life, Mrs. Sheridan had lived in Army circles. She was the daughter of General D. H. Rucker, who was Quartermaster General of the Army. About 24 years younger than General Sheridan, who was born in 1831, Mrs. Sheridan spent most of her girlhood in Washington and at Army posts. She was born at Fort Union, New Mexico.

While a bridesmaid at a wedding in Chicago, in 1874, Irene Rucker met General Sheridan, who made his headquarters there. For the next few months he courted her steadily, and contemporaries still recall the hero of the Civil War and “pretty Miss Rucker’ riding down Wabash avenue in an open carriage. They were married the following year.

NOTES
This photo negative taken by a Chicago Daily News photographer. Cite as: DN-0077384, Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago History Museum. http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/ireneruc.htm

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »